bygonelondon.com

A capsule of German cultural history in London

Imperial Crown of the Holy Roman Empire

From the 15th century onward, the crown was housed in Nuremberg – until 1796, when the priceless relic was brought to Vienna to protect it from Napoleon. The crown remained in Vienna until 1938 when Hitler returned it to Nuremberg. In 1946, American soldiers brought the piece back to Vienna, where it has remained ever since. The British Museum is exhibiting one of several replicas.

Share

Children learn history of school at 90th birthday celebration

Three-year-olds are not the usual guests at a 90th birthday party but this was no ordinary celebration – as it was their school marking the milestone anniversary.

St Helen’s College in Parkway, Hillingdon, is in its 90th school year and children as young as three helped to mark the occasion during an action packed day of events.

Youngsters learnt the story of the school’s namesake, took part in a quiz, created artwork and visited an exhibition on the history of the school to mark the anniversary.

Children in the lower school even paraded in the green and white colours of St Helen’s wearing hats they had designed specially for the celebration.


Headteacher Jill Crehan said: “The hats were amazing, portraying in very inventive ways the history of the school.

“It has been wonderful for children throughout the school to understand that they are part of the long heritage of St Helen’s College and to have been inspired by the story of St Helen herself.”

The lower and upper school joined forces to create a giant 90 in the school playground but a last minute cancellation from a photographer the school had hired for the day saw Mrs Crehan, who leads the school with her husband Dominic, climb onto the school roof in her heels to get a snap of the memorable moment.

Mr Crehan said: “We are very proud of our history and of the school St Helen’s is today, especially that the school has retained its family feel through the generations.

“My wife and I have been heads at the school for 27 years now and my wife’s mother Joan Evans was headmistress for 17 years before that.

“We were delighted that she was able to be our guest of honour at the celebration,” he said.

Former pupils and staff who were at the school with Mrs Evans returned to share their memories of days gone past, telling pupils about their uniforms and school dinners.

A new dining hall named The Evans Hall was unveiled on the day by the former headteacher.

Share

Cutty Sark damaged after fire breaks out

“Crews carried out salvage work on the ship.”

Despite the relatively small size of the blaze, four fire crews and 21
firefighters were deployed to avoid a repeat of the fire that tore through
the Greenwich attraction in May 2007.

That fire is thought to have been caused by a vacuum cleaner left on while
conservation work was being carried out.

There were fears the ancient vessel was so badly damaged that it was beyond
repair and would have to be destroyed.

But painstaking restoration work costing £10m and lasting over five years
meant it was opened to the public again in April 2012.

A fire investigation team is currently at the Cutty Sark trying to determine
the cause of the fire.

However, the attraction was opened to visitors at 10.30am this morning as
usual.

The Cutty Sark Crew, who runs the ship, said on Twitter: “London Fire Brigade
dealt with a small fire on the ship this morning. Brought under control very
quickly. The ship will open at 10.30am today.”

It later added: “Thanks to all well wishers, the cause of the fire is under
investigation and we will let you know as soon as we know more.”

Sheryl Twigg, a spokesman for the National Maritime Museum which manages the
Cutty Sark, praised firefighters for their swift efforts.

“The damage is very limited, it was a very small fire and the ship opened
pretty much as normal’, she said.

“The fire crews responded really rapidly, they turned up really quickly and
sorted it.”

She said the impact was limited to smoke damage, and the fire would have been
picked up by on-board detectors.

The fire started on the Tween deck, which is below the upper deck on the ship.

Share

Exhibition opening at the British Museum explores 600 years of German history

Exhibition opening at the British Museum explores 600 years of German history

A Volkswagen Beetle Type 1 (1953) is displayed at the

From a copy of the mediaeval Gutenberg bibl to Karl Marx’s Capital, an exhibition opening at the British Museum in London explores 600 years of German history frequently overshadowed by Nazi horrors.

The show “Germany, memories of a nation” runs until January, with an iconic 1953 Volkswagen Beetle car gracing the museum’s entrance hall.

The post-war vehicle serves as a symbol for a show that seeks to get beyond tired World War II cliches about Germany that have proved particularly persistent in Britain.

“There is this focus especially on the period of the Third Reich, and any section of German history books in Britain will be overwhelmingly dominated by the World War II,” Barrie Cook, one of the exhibition’s curators, told AFP.

A replica sculpture of Der Schwebende (The Floating One) by Ernst Barlach (1927) is displayed at the

“That is a very strong focus of how we think about Germany’s history and the modern German has to deal with that immediate legacy,” he said.

The exhibition confronts that period head on, displaying a replica of the sign outside the Buchenwald concentration camp with the chilling slogan “Jedem das Seine” (To Each His Own).

But its 200 exhibits draw from very varied periods of German history and include a hat lost by Napoleon in the Battle of Waterloo and a famous portrait of the poet Goethe.

Timed to coincide with the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall on November 9, 1989, the exhibition aims to reflect “a history full of triumphs and tragedies”.

A painting by German artist J H W Tischbein entitled

There is no chronological order to the show, which begins with a video of the fall of the Wall projected onto a map of a country whose contours have changed vastly over the centuries.

Antidote to the stereotypes

Among the assembled objects is a gold clock built by the watchmaker Isaac Habrecht like the one he made for Strasbourg cathedral; a porcelain rhinoceros as a reminder of the city of Meissen’s famous craft tradition and a wooden cradle designed by the 20th century Bauhaus school.

A replica of the gate of Buchenwald concentration camp is displayed at the

The British Museum also tackles the thorny issue of formerly German towns and territories like Strasbourg and Basel or Kaliningrad, that have lost their German populations.

Cook said German museums are reluctant to touch on this sensitive period of history and are “over-cautious.”

The show has received overwhelmingly positive reviews.

“It’s an interesting approach,” said Bernhard Schulz, a correspondent for Berlin’s Tagesspiegel daily.

“It’s not a historical exhibition in the true sense of the word… It is more a history of memories of Germany, of what is focal to the German consciousness in general,” he said.

The London Times daily said it offers “myriad antidotes to all those tabloid stereotypes of Europe’s most powerful nation.”

(AFP)

Share

London show tackles German cliches

Exhibition opening at the British Museum explores 600 years of German history

A Volkswagen Beetle Type 1 (1953) is displayed at the

From a copy of the mediaeval Gutenberg bibl to Karl Marx’s Capital, an exhibition opening at the British Museum in London explores 600 years of German history frequently overshadowed by Nazi horrors.

The show “Germany, memories of a nation” runs until January, with an iconic 1953 Volkswagen Beetle car gracing the museum’s entrance hall.

The post-war vehicle serves as a symbol for a show that seeks to get beyond tired World War II cliches about Germany that have proved particularly persistent in Britain.

“There is this focus especially on the period of the Third Reich, and any section of German history books in Britain will be overwhelmingly dominated by the World War II,” Barrie Cook, one of the exhibition’s curators, told AFP.

A replica sculpture of Der Schwebende (The Floating One) by Ernst Barlach (1927) is displayed at the

“That is a very strong focus of how we think about Germany’s history and the modern German has to deal with that immediate legacy,” he said.

The exhibition confronts that period head on, displaying a replica of the sign outside the Buchenwald concentration camp with the chilling slogan “Jedem das Seine” (To Each His Own).

But its 200 exhibits draw from very varied periods of German history and include a hat lost by Napoleon in the Battle of Waterloo and a famous portrait of the poet Goethe.

Timed to coincide with the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall on November 9, 1989, the exhibition aims to reflect “a history full of triumphs and tragedies”.

A painting by German artist J H W Tischbein entitled

There is no chronological order to the show, which begins with a video of the fall of the Wall projected onto a map of a country whose contours have changed vastly over the centuries.

Antidote to the stereotypes

Among the assembled objects is a gold clock built by the watchmaker Isaac Habrecht like the one he made for Strasbourg cathedral; a porcelain rhinoceros as a reminder of the city of Meissen’s famous craft tradition and a wooden cradle designed by the 20th century Bauhaus school.

A replica of the gate of Buchenwald concentration camp is displayed at the

The British Museum also tackles the thorny issue of formerly German towns and territories like Strasbourg and Basel or Kaliningrad, that have lost their German populations.

Cook said German museums are reluctant to touch on this sensitive period of history and are “over-cautious.”

The show has received overwhelmingly positive reviews.

“It’s an interesting approach,” said Bernhard Schulz, a correspondent for Berlin’s Tagesspiegel daily.

“It’s not a historical exhibition in the true sense of the word… It is more a history of memories of Germany, of what is focal to the German consciousness in general,” he said.

The London Times daily said it offers “myriad antidotes to all those tabloid stereotypes of Europe’s most powerful nation.”

(AFP)

Share

The future underground: London’s new spaceship-style Tube designs


.cnn_html_media_utility::before{color:red;content:’>>’;font-size:9px;line-height:12px;padding-right:1px}
.cnnstrylccimg640{margin:0 27px 14px 0}
.captionText{filter:alpha(opacity=100);opacity:1}
.cnn_html_slideshow_media_caption a,.cnn_html_slideshow_media_caption a:visited,.cnn_html_slideshow_media_caption a:link,.captionText a,.captionText a:visited,.captiontext a:link{color:outline:medium none}
.cnnVerticalGalleryPhoto{margin:0 auto;padding-right:68px;width:270px}
]]>

The new London Underground Tube train has been unveiled. It is both futuristic and in line with existing designs -- but is driverless.The new London Underground Tube train has been unveiled. It is both futuristic and in line with existing designs — but is driverless.

A fleet of 250 trains are being prepared, and they are expected to remain in service for 40 years.A fleet of 250 trains are being prepared, and they are expected to remain in service for 40 years.

Traditional elements of the iconic design heritage, such as the famous London Underground logo, color scheme and typeface, have been preserved.Traditional elements of the iconic design heritage, such as the famous London Underground logo, color scheme and typeface, have been preserved.

One of the main innovations is that individual carriages will be removed in favor of a single walk-through design.One of the main innovations is that individual carriages will be removed in favor of a single “walk-through design”.

A new air cooling system has been installed behind the walls and floor. It is so lightweight and slimline that it takes up the minimum of space, and is imperceptible from the inside.A new air cooling system has been installed behind the walls and floor. It is so lightweight and slimline that it takes up the minimum of space, and is imperceptible from the inside.

The traditional comfortable seats have been preserved, though made slightly slimmer.The traditional comfortable seats have been preserved, though made slightly slimmer.

Automobile-style logos have been placed at key points around the train, enhancing the impression of quality. Here it adorns one of the air vents.Automobile-style logos have been placed at key points around the train, enhancing the impression of quality. Here it adorns one of the air vents.

The first trains are expected to be rolled out in the mid 2020s.The first trains are expected to be rolled out in the mid 2020s.


1


2


3


4


5


6


7


8

London (CNN) — Close one eye, and it could almost — almost — pass for a regular underground train. Close the other, and it looks like a space shuttle from Star Trek.

The truth is somewhere in between. This is the long-awaited new Tube train for London, which features driverless technology, a single “walk-through” interior rather than individual carriages, and advanced air-cooling systems hidden behind the walls.

But it’s not all change: the design includes the traditional London Underground colors and typography, as well as seats and interiors that are comfortably familiar.

“London’s Tube is one of the most iconic trains in the world,” says Paul Priestman, Director of Priestmangoode, the agency that designed the train.

“We are proud to have designed something that it is part of the very fabric of London life, celebrating all that’s great about London’s environment: cutting edge technology, rich history and diversity.”

READ: Humor and humanity, four decades of London Underground

The end of the line for old-fashioned carriages

The fleet of 250 new trains will be “rolled out” in the mid-2020s, and are anticipated to remain in service for 40 years.

A new design was necessary to cope with the increasing demand. Transport for London (TfL) expects London’s population to rise from its current level, about 8.4 million, to approximately 10 million by 2030.

The new “walk-through” design will provide up to 60% greater capacity in comparison to the existing trains, allowing lines like the Bakerloo and Central to carry between 8,000 and 12,000 passengers every hour.

“The principal challenge was that the deep tube tunnels are very narrow, so the train themselves are confined to really small spaces,” says Priestman.

“We also had to address making the components lightweight and creating enough space for air cooling systems.”

READ: London Underground, 10 tips for Tube survival

Driving an icon into the next century

The length of the intended lifespan of the trains also presented some challenges. “We needed to think about materials that will ‘wear in’, or look better with age, rather than wear out,” Priestman says.

“What’s interesting with transport is that if you design something that looks too futuristic, the likelihood is that it will very quickly look dated. So you need to strike a balance with the design, create something iconic to take passengers into the future whilst avoiding clichés.”

As there is currently a range of trains from different periods running on the Underground, Priestman and his team were able to cherry-pick the most important and recognizable elements of past designs, and innovate around them.

“If you look at the London Underground compared to other subway systems, the trains are more comfortable,” he says. “We would have liked to have created more floor space but it became apparent early on in the process that this space was required for elements such as air cooling.”

READ: London Underground fast facts

The coolest of Tube trains?

As anybody who has traveled on the tube in the summer will testify, the addition of air cooling systems was of paramount importance. At the moment, only the Metropolitan and District line trains have air conditioning; the new design will enable cool air to be extended to the deeper lines.

Much effort was applied to employing the most lightweight materials available, enabling the new cooling systems to fit neatly behind the walls.

“The new Tube for London will take the city into the future by enriching the everyday journey of its passengers,” says Priestman. “It was a privilege to design something so iconic and long-lasting.”

Did artists eerily predict the Ukraine crisis?

Would you eat Fukushima soup?

The lost art of the American pin-up


Share