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UK faces biggest terrorism threat in its history: minister


LONDON (Reuters) – Britain is facing the biggest terrorism threat in its history and has foiled around 40 major plots since suicide bombers attacked London in 2005, Home Secretary Theresa May said on Monday.

The government would on Wednesday set out new laws to take on the militants, May added, including legislation making it easier for security services to track attackers online, and check if radicalized fighters were flying into Britain.

“When the security and intelligence agencies tell us that the threat we face is now more dangerous than at any time before or since 9/11 we should take notice,” the home secretary (interior minister) said in a speech.

Insurance companies would be barred from providing cover for ransom payments under the new legislation and airlines would be banned if they failed to provide information on passengers flying to Britain, she added.

The government has said Britons returning from fighting in Syria and Iraq provide one of the most serious threats.

May said around 40 terrorist plots had been disrupted since four young Britons carried out suicide bomb attacks in London in 2005, killing 52 people.

These included attempts to conduct Mumbai-style gun attacks on British streets, blow up the London Stock Exchange, bring down airliners and murder a British ambassador and military servicemen, she added.

“Almost all of these attacks have been prevented,” said May. “But … the terrorists only have to be lucky once.”

Planned new measures include giving police the power to seize for up to 30 days the passports of British and foreign nationals suspected of traveling to take part in terrorist-related activities, said May.

The new laws will also make it easier for police to identify who is using an Internet service at any given time.

London’s top police officer on Sunday said authorities are increasingly worried about a “lone wolf”-style attack and have foiled four or five plots this year.

On Monday, Mark Rowley, Britain’s top counter-terrorism officer, said police were “stretched” but had stepped up their efforts, making 271 arrests this year. Warning the threat would remain high for several years, he said the public’s help was needed in spotting potential attackers.

Around half of Britons traveling to Syria are newly radicalized and not previously known to police, Rowley said.

“I would never use the word inevitable but of course … terrorists do sometimes succeed,” he added. “We are going to do everything we possibly can do to stop that happening.”

Britain raised its terrorism alert to the second-highest level in August, saying an attack was now “highly likely”.

(Reporting by Andrew Osborn and Kylie MacLellan; Editing by Stephen Addison)

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UK Faces Biggest Terrorism Threat In Its History: Minister

LONDON, Nov 24 (Reuters) – Britain is facing the biggest terrorism threat in its history and has foiled around 40 major plots since suicide bombers attacked London in 2005, Home Secretary Theresa May said on Monday.

The government would on Wednesday set out new laws to take on the militants, May added, including legislation making it easier for security services to track attackers online, and check if radicalized fighters were flying into Britain.

“When the security and intelligence agencies tell us that the threat we face is now more dangerous than at any time before or since 9/11 we should take notice,” the home secretary (interior minister) said in a speech.

Insurance companies would be barred from providing cover for ransom payments under the new legislation and airlines would be banned if they failed to provide information on passengers flying to Britain, she added.

The government has said Britons returning from fighting in Syria and Iraq provide one of the most serious threats.

May said around 40 terrorist plots had been disrupted since four young Britons carried out suicide bomb attacks in London in 2005, killing 52 people.

These included attempts to conduct Mumbai-style gun attacks on British streets, blow up the London Stock Exchange, bring down airliners and murder a British ambassador and military servicemen, she added.

“Almost all of these attacks have been prevented,” said May. “But … the terrorists only have to be lucky once.”

Planned new measures include giving police the power to seize for up to 30 days the passports of British and foreign nationals suspected of traveling to take part in terrorist-related activities, said May.

The new laws will also make it easier for police to identify who is using an Internet service at any given time.

London’s top police officer on Sunday said authorities are increasingly worried about a “lone wolf”-style attack and have foiled four or five plots this year.

On Monday, Mark Rowley, Britain’s top counter-terrorism officer, said police were “stretched” but had stepped up their efforts, making 271 arrests this year. Warning the threat would remain high for several years, he said the public’s help was needed in spotting potential attackers.

Around half of Britons traveling to Syria are newly radicalized and not previously known to police, Rowley said.

“I would never use the word inevitable but of course … terrorists do sometimes succeed,” he added. “We are going to do everything we possibly can do to stop that happening.”

Britain raised its terrorism alert to the second-highest level in August, saying an attack was now “highly likely.” (Reporting by Andrew Osborn and Kylie MacLellan; Editing by Stephen Addison)

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Rare Stegosaurus skeleton to debut at London museum

Stegosaurus-before-mount

 (© The Trustees of Natural History Museum, London)

A rare skeleton of a nearly 10-foot-tall, 150-million-year-old Stegosaurus will be unveiled at the Natural History Museum in London next month. The skeleton is the museum’s first complete dinosaur to go on display in almost 100 years, and is the only Stegosaurus skeleton in a public collection outside the United States.

The dinosaur (Stegosaurus stenops) was an herbivore that lived about 155 million to 150 million years ago, during the late Jurassic Period. Stegosaurus, known for the two rows of bony plates along its back, primarily lived in western North America.

The new specimen also hailed from the American West. Bob Simon, president of Virginia Dinosaur Company and Dinosaur Safaris, a private corporation that excavates and preserves Jurassic dinosaur bones, discovered the Stegosaurus in spring 2003 at the Red Canyon Ranch in Wyoming. The skeleton was almost fully connected it was missing only the left arm and base of its tail and took three weeks to excavate. [See stunning photos of the Stegosaurus skeleton]

Finding a near-complete Stegosaurus skeleton is unusual, said Paul Barrett, lead dinosaur researcher at the museum.

“It’s an honor to have this extraordinary specimen permanently on display to inspire Natural History Museum visitors,” Barrett said in a statement. “Stegosaurusfossil finds are rare. Having the world’s most complete example here for research means we can begin to uncover the secrets behind the evolution and behavior of this intriguing dinosaur species.”

The Stegosaurus was a young adult when it died, but it’s unclear whether it was male or female, researchers said. Measurements show that its skeleton, containing more than 300 bones, is 18.3 feet long, comparable in size to a 4×4 truck.

The specimen includes 19 plates on its back and four spikes on its tail, making it the most complete stegosaurus plate set ever found, researchers said. Moreover, the skull bones aren’t squashed, but three-dimensional and detached from one another, making it easy for scientists to study the dinosaur’s eating habits and bite strength.

Since the Stegosaurus arrived at the museum in December 2013, researchers have been busy taking measurements, photographs, laser surface scans and CT scans of the skeleton to learn more about its anatomy.

The Natural History Museum, which holds 8 million fossils, is known for the 85.3-foot-tall cast of a Diplodocus a long-necked, long-tailed dinosaur that roamed western North America in the Jurassic Period stationed near the entryway, but the new dinosaur will likely draw larger crowds.

“It inspires genuine wonder when you see it, but unlike our much-lovedDiplodocuscast, this is the real thing,” said Sir Michael Dixon, director of the museum. “We hope that this amazing specimen will inspire a new generation of young visitors to learn more about the natural world and our place within it.”

Copyright 2014 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

LONDON – Curators at London’s Wellcome Collection will not be surprised if lines form outside their new “Institute of Sexology” exhibition.

“It’s free and it’s got sex in the title,” co-curator Kate Ford said Wednesday.

The collection is mostly a witty look at the study of human sexuality, featuring notables from Sigmund Freud to Playboy founder Hugh Hefner and director Woody Allen. It also has serious elements, including searing black-and-white film footage of the Nazis burning the library of noted German sex researcher Magnus Hirschfeld in 1933.

“He was openly gay and Jewish, so a natural (Nazi) target,” Ford said. The new exhibit is named after Hirschfeld’s original Institute of Sexology to honour him and other sex research pioneers.

The exhibit shows the world’s changing views toward the human sexual experience, with displays devoted to innovators like Alfred Kinsey and the duo of William Masters and Virginia Johnson — including displays of the intimidating lab devices they used to measure sexual response.

The section on Freud includes a copy of a two-page handwritten note he wrote to a distraught mother assuring her that her son’s homosexuality was not a disease.

Also included is an unusual full-size replica of Wilhelm Reich’s experimental Orgone Accumulator, which he believed would help cure a variety of diseases — and a film clip from Allen’s classic film comedy “Sleeper” that parodies Reich’s invention with a device called the “Orgasmatron.”

A Playboy magazine cover is included, in part because of Hefner’s strong support of the research of Masters and Johnson.

“It shows how their ideas about the physiology of sex made its way into popular culture,” said Ford, who says the exhibit also shows society’s evolving tolerance of same-sex relationships.

The exhibit opens Thursday and runs until September.

By Gregory Katz, The Associated Press

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London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

By GREGORY KATZ
Associated Press

LONDON (AP) – Curators at London’s Wellcome Collection will not be surprised if lines form outside their new “Institute of Sexology” exhibition.

“It’s free and it’s got sex in the title,” co-curator Kate Ford said Wednesday.

The collection is mostly a witty look at the study of human sexuality, featuring notables from Sigmund Freud to Playboy founder Hugh Hefner and director Woody Allen. It also has serious elements, including searing black-and-white film footage of the Nazis burning the library of noted German sex researcher Magnus Hirschfeld in 1933.

“He was openly gay and Jewish, so a natural (Nazi) target,” Ford said. The new exhibit is named after Hirschfeld’s original Institute of Sexology to honor him and other sex research pioneers.

The exhibit shows the world’s changing views toward the human sexual experience, with displays devoted to innovators like Alfred Kinsey and the duo of William Masters and Virginia Johnson – including displays of the intimidating lab devices they used to measure sexual response.

The section on Freud includes a copy of a two-page handwritten note he wrote to a distraught mother assuring her that her son’s homosexuality was not a disease.

Also included is an unusual full-size replica of Wilhelm Reich’s experimental Orgone Accumulator, which he believed would help cure a variety of diseases – and a film clip from Allen’s classic film comedy “Sleeper” that parodies Reich’s invention with a device called the “Orgasmatron.”

A Playboy magazine cover is included, in part because of Hefner’s strong support of the research of Masters and Johnson.

“It shows how their ideas about the physiology of sex made its way into popular culture,” said Ford, who says the exhibit also shows society’s evolving tolerance of same-sex relationships.

The exhibit opens Thursday and runs until September.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Share

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

A member of the media looks at items on display at the Wellcome collection’s Institute of Sexology ‘Undress Your Mind’ exhibition in London, Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014. The exhibition explores the most publicly discussed of private acts, with items from Alfred Kinsey’s complex coded questionnaires to ancient artefacts. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

A member of staff from the Wellcome Collection poses for photographers in the Orgone Accumulator invented by Wilhelm Reich in 1940 at the Wellcome collection’s Institute of Sexology ‘Undress Your Mind’ exhibition in London, Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014. Reich theorised that deficits in so-called Orgone energy were at the root of many diseases, in the way that Sigmund Freud argued constrictions in the libido could produce neuroses. Intended as a medical device is was popularised as an enhancer of sexual energy and parodied as the Orgasmatron in Woody Allen’s film Sleeper. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

A member of staff from the Wellcome Collection poses for photographers in the Orgone Accumulator invented by Wilhelm Reich in 1940 at the Wellcome collection’s Institute of Sexology ‘Undress Your Mind’ exhibition in London, Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014. Reich theorised that deficits in so-called Orgone energy were at the root of many diseases, in the way that Sigmund Freud argued constrictions in the libido could produce neuroses. Intended as a medical device is was popularised as an enhancer of sexual energy and parodied as the Orgasmatron in Woody Allen’s film Sleeper. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

Members of the media watch a multimedia display, which includes an early AIDS poster, left, at the Wellcome collection’s Institute of Sexology ‘Undress Your Mind’ exhibition in London, Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014. The exhibition explores the most publicly discussed of private acts, with items from Alfred Kinsey’s complex coded questionnaires to ancient artefacts. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

A member of staff from the Wellcome Collection poses for photographers in the Orgone Accumulator invented by Wilhelm Reich in 1940 at the Wellcome collection’s Institute of Sexology ‘Undress Your Mind’ exhibition in London, Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014. Reich theorised that deficits in so-called Orgone energy were at the root of many diseases, in the way that Sigmund Freud argued constrictions in the libido could produce neuroses. Intended as a medical device is was popularised as an enhancer of sexual energy and parodied as the Orgasmatron in Woody Allen’s film Sleeper. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

A member of staff from the Wellcome Collection poses for photographers in the Orgone Accumulator invented by Wilhelm Reich in 1940 at the Wellcome collection’s Institute of Sexology ‘Undress Your Mind’ exhibition in London, Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014. Reich theorised that deficits in so-called Orgone energy were at the root of many diseases, in the way that Sigmund Freud argued constrictions in the libido could produce neuroses. Intended as a medical device is was popularised as an enhancer of sexual energy and parodied as the Orgasmatron in Woody Allen’s film Sleeper. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)



Posted: Wednesday, November 19, 2014 8:22 am
|


Updated: 7:46 pm, Wed Nov 19, 2014.

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

Associated Press |

LONDON (AP) — Curators at London’s Wellcome Collection will not be surprised if lines form outside their new “Institute of Sexology” exhibition.

“It’s free and it’s got sex in the title,” co-curator Kate Ford said Wednesday.

The collection is mostly a witty look at the study of human sexuality, featuring notables from Sigmund Freud to Playboy founder Hugh Hefner and director Woody Allen. It also has serious elements, including searing black-and-white film footage of the Nazis burning the library of noted German sex researcher Magnus Hirschfeld in 1933.

“He was openly gay and Jewish, so a natural (Nazi) target,” Ford said. The new exhibit is named after Hirschfeld’s original Institute of Sexology to honor him and other sex research pioneers.

The exhibit shows the world’s changing views toward the human sexual experience, with displays devoted to innovators like Alfred Kinsey and the duo of William Masters and Virginia Johnson — including displays of the intimidating lab devices they used to measure sexual response.

The section on Freud includes a copy of a two-page handwritten note he wrote to a distraught mother assuring her that her son’s homosexuality was not a disease.

Also included is an unusual full-size replica of Wilhelm Reich’s experimental Orgone Accumulator, which he believed would help cure a variety of diseases — and a film clip from Allen’s classic film comedy “Sleeper” that parodies Reich’s invention with a device called the “Orgasmatron.”

A Playboy magazine cover is included, in part because of Hefner’s strong support of the research of Masters and Johnson.

“It shows how their ideas about the physiology of sex made its way into popular culture,” said Ford, who says the exhibit also shows society’s evolving tolerance of same-sex relationships.

The exhibit opens Thursday and runs until September.

© 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Wednesday, November 19, 2014 8:22 am.

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Broadcaster Huw Edwards explores the history of London’s Welsh chapels in his …

The story of the Welsh in London spans a thousand years and in many ways is still largely untold.

Broadcaster and journalist Huw Edwards says it is impossible to understand the history of the Welsh in London without appreciating the central place of organised religion.

In his new book, City Mission, he traces an intriguing story of London’s Welsh chapels which spans several centuries.

But his book is far more than a story of chapels and churches. It sheds light on the story of one of London’s first ethnic minorities – the Welsh.

“The Welsh have made a significant contribution to the story of London,” said Huw, who has lived in the capital for more than 30 years.

“It’s a contribution that deserves greater recognition now that London takes pride in its status as the world’s most culturally diverse capital city.”

No city in the world can rival London for its cultural diversity. But one of its oldest ethnic communities – Cymry Llundain, the London Welsh – is one of the least prominent and least understood.

Huw said religion provides a vital key to unlock that mystery.

As his book sheds new light on the religious tradition of the Welsh in London the elusive tale of the capital’s Welsh is unveiled.

“The Welsh Nonconformist chapels and a small number of Welsh-speaking Anglican churches were far and away the most significant centres of Welsh life in the city throughout the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century,” said Huw.

He said religious nonconformity redefined Wales and Welshness.

“In rejecting the state religion of England, Welsh people built a new identity for themselves.

“The same process also shaped the London Welsh community in an age when thousands of Cymry made for the metropolis.”

It follows that the chapels are a vital element in the rich story of the Welsh in London.

Huw said: “Without understanding the roots and functions of the chapel network we cannot hope to understand the complex dynamics of the London Welsh community over the years.

“On the eve of the Second World War there were 31 Welsh chapels and churches throughout London but by 2014 the number of functioning chapels had fallen to seven.

“Given the fragility of so many causes in Welsh cities, towns and villages, the survival of as many as seven Welsh chapels in London is surely admirable.

“Writing in 1947 the Reverend Llywelyn Williams of Kings Cross regretted that only a small percentage of the Welsh who came to London remained loyal to the religion of their homeland. He criticised those who shed their Welsh attire and posed as urban Englishmen and praised the minority whose weekly programmes included Sunday school, the service, the sermon and the desire to be part of the Christian fellowship.”

Huw said chapels have rarely featured in serious discussions about the future of the Welsh community in London and added that quick action must be taken to safeguard their religious tradition.

“The time will come, sooner than we think, to decided on a single place of worship for the Welsh in London.

“It is a fact that the London Welsh, with a few exceptions, have been singularly unwilling to make bold, radical sensible decisions about their places of worship.

“That must surely change if we are to preserve our rich heritage for generations to come.”

While there was still growth in the London Welsh chapel scene up until the 1950s their relevance as centres of religion and social life has now hugely diminished.

Huw said: “The prospects are patchy and on current form the forecast for future is unsettling.

“It is likely that the vibrant, impressive network of the 1950s will be further reduced by the end of the century.”

Huw said the important contribution of the churches throughout the centuries deserves to be recorded.

He said: “Even though the chapels no longer attract crowds of today’s London Welsh they still deserve our respect and gratitude for what they have achieved and contributed over the centuries. The few that survive also deserve something else – our support.

“With the right strategy and support it could serve the capital’s Welsh community for decades to come.

“The alternative – having for Welsh chapel or church at our disposal – would be unthinkable.

“No self-respecting ethnic community in London would tolerate such a grotesque failure – a failure that future generations of patriotic Welsh men and women in London will not be able to understand or forgive.”

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Rare Stegosaurus Skeleton to Debut at London Museum

A rare skeleton of a nearly 10-foot-tall (3 meters), 150-million-year-old Stegosaurus will be unveiled at the Natural History Museum in London next month. The skeleton is the museum’s first complete dinosaur to go on display in almost 100 years, and is the only Stegosaurus skeleton in a public collection outside the United States.

The dinosaur (Stegosaurus stenops) was an herbivore that lived about 155 million to 150 million years ago, during the late Jurassic Period. Stegosaurus, known for the two rows of bony plates along its back, primarily lived in western North America.

The new specimen also hailed from the American West. Bob Simon, president of Virginia Dinosaur Company and Dinosaur Safaris, a private corporation that excavates and preserves Jurassic dinosaur bones, discovered the Stegosaurus in spring 2003 at the Red Canyon Ranch in Wyoming. The skeleton was almost fully connected — it was missing only the left arm and base of its tail — and took three weeks to excavate. [See stunning photos of the Stegosaurus skeleton]

Finding a near-complete Stegosaurus skeleton is unusual, said Paul Barrett, lead dinosaur researcher at the museum.

“It’s an honor to have this extraordinary specimen permanently on display to inspire Natural History Museum visitors,” Barrett said in a statement. “Stegosaurus fossil finds are rare. Having the world’s most complete example here for research means we can begin to uncover the secrets behind the evolution and behavior of this intriguing dinosaur species.”

The Stegosaurus was a young adult when it died, but it’s unclear whether it was male or female, researchers said. Measurements show that its skeleton, containing more than 300 bones, is 18.3 feet long (5.6 m), comparable in size to a 4×4 truck.

The specimen includes 19 plates on its back and four spikes on its tail, making it the most complete stegosaurus plate set ever found, researchers said. Moreover, the skull bones aren’t squashed, but three-dimensional and detached from one another, making it easy for scientists to study the dinosaur’s eating habits and bite strength. 

Since the Stegosaurus arrived at the museum in December 2013, researchers have been busy taking measurements, photographs, laser surface scans and CT scans of the skeleton to learn more about its anatomy.

The Natural History Museum, which holds 8 million fossils, is known for the 85.3-foot-tall (26 m) cast of a Diplodocus — a long-necked, long-tailed dinosaur that roamed western North America in the Jurassic Period — stationed near the entryway, but the new dinosaur will likely draw larger crowds.

“It inspires genuine wonder when you see it, but unlike our much-loved Diplodocus cast, this is the real thing,” said Sir Michael Dixon, director of the museum. “We hope that this amazing specimen will inspire a new generation of young visitors to learn more about the natural world and our place within it.”

Follow Laura Geggel on Twitter @LauraGeggel. Follow Live Science @livescience, Facebook  Google+. Original article on Live Science.

Copyright 2014 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

LONDON (AP) — Curators at London’s Wellcome Collection will not be surprised if lines form outside their new “Institute of Sexology” exhibition.

“It’s free and it’s got sex in the title,” co-curator Kate Ford said Wednesday.

The collection is mostly a witty look at the study of human sexuality, featuring notables from Sigmund Freud to Playboy founder Hugh Hefner and director Woody Allen. It also has serious elements, including searing black-and-white film footage of the Nazis burning the library of noted German sex researcher Magnus Hirschfeld in 1933.

“He was openly gay and Jewish, so a natural (Nazi) target,” Ford said. The new exhibit is named after Hirschfeld’s original Institute of Sexology to honor him and other sex research pioneers.

The exhibit shows the world’s changing views toward the human sexual experience, with displays devoted to innovators like Alfred Kinsey and the duo of William Masters and Virginia Johnson — including displays of the intimidating lab devices they used to measure sexual response.

The section on Freud includes a copy of a two-page handwritten note he wrote to a distraught mother assuring her that her son’s homosexuality was not a disease.

Also included is an unusual full-size replica of Wilhelm Reich’s experimental Orgone Accumulator, which he believed would help cure a variety of diseases — and a film clip from Allen’s classic film comedy “Sleeper” that parodies Reich’s invention with a device called the “Orgasmatron.”

A Playboy magazine cover is included, in part because of Hefner’s strong support of the research of Masters and Johnson.

“It shows how their ideas about the physiology of sex made its way into popular culture,” said Ford, who says the exhibit also shows society’s evolving tolerance of same-sex relationships.

The exhibit opens Thursday and runs until September.

Share

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

A member of the media looks at items on display at the Wellcome collection’s Institute of Sexology ‘Undress Your Mind’ exhibition in London, Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014. The exhibition explores the most publicly discussed of private acts, with items from Alfred Kinsey’s complex coded questionnaires to ancient artefacts. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

A member of staff from the Wellcome Collection poses for photographers in the Orgone Accumulator invented by Wilhelm Reich in 1940 at the Wellcome collection’s Institute of Sexology ‘Undress Your Mind’ exhibition in London, Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014. Reich theorised that deficits in so-called Orgone energy were at the root of many diseases, in the way that Sigmund Freud argued constrictions in the libido could produce neuroses. Intended as a medical device is was popularised as an enhancer of sexual energy and parodied as the Orgasmatron in Woody Allen’s film Sleeper. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

A member of staff from the Wellcome Collection poses for photographers in the Orgone Accumulator invented by Wilhelm Reich in 1940 at the Wellcome collection’s Institute of Sexology ‘Undress Your Mind’ exhibition in London, Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014. Reich theorised that deficits in so-called Orgone energy were at the root of many diseases, in the way that Sigmund Freud argued constrictions in the libido could produce neuroses. Intended as a medical device is was popularised as an enhancer of sexual energy and parodied as the Orgasmatron in Woody Allen’s film Sleeper. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

Members of the media watch a multimedia display, which includes an early AIDS poster, left, at the Wellcome collection’s Institute of Sexology ‘Undress Your Mind’ exhibition in London, Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014. The exhibition explores the most publicly discussed of private acts, with items from Alfred Kinsey’s complex coded questionnaires to ancient artefacts. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

A member of staff from the Wellcome Collection poses for photographers in the Orgone Accumulator invented by Wilhelm Reich in 1940 at the Wellcome collection’s Institute of Sexology ‘Undress Your Mind’ exhibition in London, Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014. Reich theorised that deficits in so-called Orgone energy were at the root of many diseases, in the way that Sigmund Freud argued constrictions in the libido could produce neuroses. Intended as a medical device is was popularised as an enhancer of sexual energy and parodied as the Orgasmatron in Woody Allen’s film Sleeper. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

A member of staff from the Wellcome Collection poses for photographers in the Orgone Accumulator invented by Wilhelm Reich in 1940 at the Wellcome collection’s Institute of Sexology ‘Undress Your Mind’ exhibition in London, Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014. Reich theorised that deficits in so-called Orgone energy were at the root of many diseases, in the way that Sigmund Freud argued constrictions in the libido could produce neuroses. Intended as a medical device is was popularised as an enhancer of sexual energy and parodied as the Orgasmatron in Woody Allen’s film Sleeper. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)



Posted: Wednesday, November 19, 2014 5:49 am

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

Associated Press |


0 comments

LONDON (AP) — Curators at London’s Wellcome Collection will not be surprised if lines forward outside their new Institute of Sexology exhibition.

Co-curator Kate Ford noted Wednesday “it’s free and it’s got sex in the title.”

The collection is a witty look at the study of human sexuality, featuring notables from Sigmund Freud to Woody Allen. There are serious elements as well, including searing black and white footage of the Nazis burning the library of a noted German sex researcher in 1933.

The exhibit shows the changing views toward the variety of human sexual experience, with displays devoted to innovators like Alfred Kinsey and the duo of William Masters and Virginia Johnson.

The exhibit opens Thursday and runs until September.

© 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Wednesday, November 19, 2014 5:49 am.


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