bygonelondon.com

From Freud to Playboy: London exhibition examines history of human sexuality


Curators at London’s Wellcome Collection will not be surprised if lines form outside their new “Institute of Sexology” exhibition.

“It’s free and it’s got sex in the title,” co-curator Kate Ford said Wednesday.

The collection is mostly a witty look at the study of human sexuality, featuring notables from Sigmund Freud to Playboy founder Hugh Hefner and director Woody Allen. It also has serious elements, including searing black-and-white film footage of the Nazis burning the library of noted German sex researcher Magnus Hirschfeld in 1933.

“He was openly gay and Jewish, so a natural (Nazi) target,” Ford said. The new exhibit is named after Hirschfeld’s original Institute of Sexology to honor him and other sex research pioneers.

The exhibit shows the world’s changing views toward the human sexual experience, with displays devoted to innovators like Alfred Kinsey and the duo of William Masters and Virginia Johnson – including displays of the intimidating lab devices they used to measure sexual response.

The section on Freud includes a copy of a two-page handwritten note he wrote to a distraught mother assuring her that her son’s homosexuality was not a disease.

Also included is an unusual full-size replica of Wilhelm Reich’s experimental Orgone Accumulator, which he believed would help cure a variety of diseases – and a film clip from Allen’s classic film comedy “Sleeper” that parodies Reich’s invention with a device called the “Orgasmatron.”

A Playboy magazine cover is included, in part because of Hefner’s strong support of the research of Masters and Johnson.

“It shows how their ideas about the physiology of sex made its way into popular culture,” said Ford, who says the exhibit also shows society’s evolving tolerance of same-sex relationships.

The exhibit opens Thursday and runs until September.

 

 

Share

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

LONDON (AP) — Curators at London’s Wellcome Collection will not be surprised if lines form outside their new “Institute of Sexology” exhibition.

“It’s free and it’s got sex in the title,” co-curator Kate Ford said Wednesday.

The collection is mostly a witty look at the study of human sexuality, featuring notables from Sigmund Freud to Playboy founder Hugh Hefner and director Woody Allen. It also has serious elements, including searing black-and-white film footage of the Nazis burning the library of noted German sex researcher Magnus Hirschfeld in 1933.

“He was openly gay and Jewish, so a natural (Nazi) target,” Ford said. The new exhibit is named after Hirschfeld’s original Institute of Sexology to honor him and other sex research pioneers.

The exhibit shows the world’s changing views toward the human sexual experience, with displays devoted to innovators like Alfred Kinsey and the duo of William Masters and Virginia Johnson — including displays of the intimidating lab devices they used to measure sexual response.

The section on Freud includes a copy of a two-page handwritten note he wrote to a distraught mother assuring her that her son’s homosexuality was not a disease.

Also included is an unusual full-size replica of Wilhelm Reich’s experimental Orgone Accumulator, which he believed would help cure a variety of diseases — and a film clip from Allen’s classic film comedy “Sleeper” that parodies Reich’s invention with a device called the “Orgasmatron.”

A Playboy magazine cover is included, in part because of Hefner’s strong support of the research of Masters and Johnson.

“It shows how their ideas about the physiology of sex made its way into popular culture,” said Ford, who says the exhibit also shows society’s evolving tolerance of same-sex relationships.

The exhibit opens Thursday and runs until September.

Share

Dishoom Restaurant Serves Slice of Indian History in London: Don’t Tell the Cops

Restaurants are usually judged more on their food and service than their design. Rightly so.

You wouldn’t go to a dentist for his comfortable chair or a hairdresser because the walls were painted in cool colors.

But when a restaurateur obsesses about details of design as well as everything else, it can add a dollop of pleasure on top of the enjoyment you are getting from the food or fun from interacting with waiters who make you happy to be there.

Shamil and Kavi Thakrar, the founders of Dishoom, take it to the extreme. The cousins have spent much of the past year trawling through historical archives and traveling to Mumbai to furnish their new establishment, which formally opens tomorrow near St. Pancras railway station in London.

This is the third outlet of the London restaurant, in which the cousins seek to recreate the ambiance of the old cafes of Bombay, the colonial name for Mumbai. These so-called Irani cafes were founded by Persian immigrants and were distinctively styled, offering a shared space for the city’s diverse populace.

Across Continents

“We tend to look at things through a Bombay lens and there are lovely parallels between the cities of London and Bombay,” Shamil Thakrar said as we toured the restaurant with Kavi.

“They were really conjoined for so many years in trade and politics and commerce and everything. St. Pancras is such a close parallel to Victoria Terminus (in Mumbai). They’re almost exactly the same: built in a mad, high-Gothic style.

“In our imagination, this might have been a goods shed behind Victoria Terminus and a guy wanders in and sees the opportunity. That period of Indian history — in our minds, this is the 1920s, 30s, 40s — was very rich. There’s a lot of changes: There’s a lot of Britishness in there but Indians are trying to assert their own identity.

“The Irani cafes had a strong role in creating shared spaces. They were probably the first spaces where people ate together. Before that, in 19th-century Bombay, people — Hindus, Muslims — would never actually eat together. There was no place for it.

“The Iranis were outside it and it was natural for people to come in and sit together. The lungs of a city are the shared spaces, it makes a real city, and we feel the same way about London.”

Design Details

Enter the new Dishoom and you may notice the Minton type floor tiles, which were popular in Mumbai in the late 19th and early 20th century. To your right are Bombay Fornicators. These are wicker chairs with extended footrests that might become handy for love-making. At the far end of the room is a replica of an A.H. Wheeler book kiosk at Mumbai Central railway station. Here, sugar-cane juice is served. The benches at the far end of the room are based on seats used to watch billiards at the Ripon Club in Mumbai.

Signs and posters throughout Dishoom reference colonial Indian history. The message: “Indian Uninvited Guest Simon Go Back” refers to the Simon Commission, which was appointed in November 1927 to assess the governance of India. Not a single member was Indian and there were storms of protest when the commission arrived in India. Across the room to the left is a row of pictures, most taken by India’s first woman photo journalist, Homai Vyarawalla. The chronological photographs tell the story of the independence movement. The last is of Vyarawalla herself.

Source: Dishoom

Source: Dishoom

Reproduction posters advertise a meeting to celebrate clothes burning, Gandhi’s campaign to reject imported clothes in favor of spinning and weaving Indian costumes. There are also Buy Swadeshi signs, promoting the purchase of Indian goods. The desk is an original from an Irani cafe. There’s also symbol of Zoroastrianism, the religion of ancient Iran.

Wash basins were common in Irani cafes. The one at Dishoom has a Gujarati admonition to the left: Paying Customers Only. To the right are some of the rules of the house: No Spitting; No Combing Hair; No Washing Your Mouth Out.

The Permit Room

The basement bar at Dishoom is called the Permit Room. This celebrates the Bombay Prohibition Act of 1949, which restricts the sale of alcohol to those with a medical permit, rather like medicinal cannabis. One of the cocktails celebrates Vasant Dhoble, Mumbai’s assistant police commissioner, known for his raids on drinking establishments. The Dhoble is a breakfast cocktail that looks like orange juice but is laced with Opihr Spiced Gin and Maraschino liqueur.

Fortunately, you don’t need to drink to enjoy Dishoom. The inexpensive Indian food is full of flavor and the service was excellent at a preview of the new restaurant, when the 350 seat restaurant was packed and about 30 people queued outside.

The restaurant was loud, dark and hopping. I doubt that many diners got a chance to examine architectural details. My tour was in the morning, but we still found time for cocktails.

Don’t tell the police.

(Richard Vines is the chief food critic for Bloomberg. Follow him on Twitter @richardvines)

Share

London Exhibit Examines History of Human Sexuality

Britain Sexology Exhibition

Associated Press

Curators at London’s Wellcome Collection will not be surprised if lines form outside their new “Institute of Sexology” exhibition.

“It’s free and it’s got sex in the title,” co-curator Kate Ford said Wednesday.

The collection is mostly a witty look at the study of human sexuality, featuring notables from Sigmund Freud to Playboy founder Hugh Hefner and director Woody Allen. It also has serious elements, including searing black-and-white film footage of the Nazis burning the library of noted German sex researcher Magnus Hirschfeld in 1933.

“He was openly gay and Jewish, so a natural (Nazi) target,” Ford said. The new exhibit is named after Hirschfeld’s original Institute of Sexology to honor him and other sex research pioneers.

The exhibit shows the world’s changing views toward the human sexual experience, with displays devoted to innovators like Alfred Kinsey and the duo of William Masters and Virginia Johnson ? including displays of the intimidating lab devices they used to measure sexual response.

The section on Freud includes a copy of a two-page handwritten note he wrote to a distraught mother assuring her that her son’s homosexuality was not a disease.

Also included is an unusual full-size replica of Wilhelm Reich’s experimental Orgone Accumulator, which he believed would help cure a variety of diseases ? and a film clip from Allen’s classic film comedy “Sleeper” that parodies Reich’s invention with a device called the “Orgasmatron.”

A Playboy magazine cover is included, in part because of Hefner’s strong support of the research of Masters and Johnson.

“It shows how their ideas about the physiology of sex made its way into popular culture,” said Ford, who says the exhibit also shows society’s evolving tolerance of same-sex relationships.

The exhibit opens Thursday and runs until September.

Share

Things To Do In London This Weekend: 22-23 November 2014

Saturday 22 November

Join in with the Oblique Winter Brunch

Join in with the Oblique Winter Brunch

BOOK SALE: Amnesty International Blackheath and Greenwich has a book sale at Church of the Ascension in Blackheath , with thousands of good quality fiction and non-fiction books available. 10am-4pm

MUSIC SEMINAR: Register now for Cr8ting Vision, a day-long free music seminar organised by the University of Westminster. Forty-plus leading music industry figureheads share their knowledge and expertise during the day, and inspire the next generation of music industry professionals. Free, register online, 10.30am-7pm

CROSSRAIL WALK: Tour guide Mark King leads the first in his series of walks around Crossrail. Breaking down its route into several parts over 2014/15, this first walk tracks west of centre, starting from a location near Paddington and ending up around Bond Street. Oyster card needed as part of the route will involve tube or bus travel. £12/£15 adult, £6/£7 child, Book by email, 10.30am-12.30pm

WINTER BRUNCH: Oblique Presents The Winter Brunch at Beach Blanket Babylon Shoreditch. The party starts at 11am with chilled out slow jams, brunch and a special happy hour. This is followed by a signature Oblique game to get everyone interacting, and then the party starts to hot up. £15-£20, prebook, 11am

GUIDED WALK: Join guide Sue Sinton Smith and explore the area around East Ham, discover its past and the future opportunities the area has to offer. Meeting point is just inside East Ham station and the walk finishes close to Upton Park station. £10/£7.50, prebook, 11am

WINTER FAIR: Stroud Green WI’s Winter Fair takes place at Stapleton Tavern on Crouch Hill. It features the work of local talented artists and craft experts, with homemade produce to tempt Christmas shoppers. And it’s in aid of local charity Open Door, so you can shop knowing you’re making a difference. 12pm-4pm

COLOMBIAN FOOD: Feel like you’re in South American at the Colombian Food Fest in the Oxo2 Tower Wharf along the South Bank today. There are plenty of food stalls plus live demonstrations by Colombian chefs Diana García and Juanita Umaña. 12pm-7pm

CITY TOUR: Occupy London Tours is a free alternative tour company, run by volunteers, who want to throw open the secretive world of finance and politics for all to see. Today they tell the story of the UK’s smallest city, the City of London, the history of money in the heart of London and the Square Mile’s role in the financial crisis of 2007/8. Find out just what the Corporation of London actually is and more. Free, prebook, 2pm

ART SCREENING: Dream:ON is a digital art screening taking place at the Goethe Institut in South Kensington. It showcases the contemporary work of emerging and established artists from Germany and around the world. £6+bf, prebook, 4.30pm

CHOIR CONCERT: Thames Chamber Choir perform at St Dunstan and All Saints Church, to mark the opening of Ian Brice‘s art exhibition. £8/£6/£4, prebook, 7.30pm

CIRCUS DINING: Façade at artsdepot in North Finchley is a circus-theatre dining experience which blurs the boundaries between the performers and the audience. Be enthralled as the Crashmat performers spin, swing and serve at your table, absorbing you into their world as you munch down on a three-course meal. £45, prebook, 7.30pm 

LIVE MUSIC: Head to the St Ethelburga’s Centre Reconciliation and Peace in Bishopsgate for an evening of music from the Eastern Mediterranean, as part of their world music series. The concert features music by Israelian percussionist Zohar Izhak Fresco. £14, prebook, 7.30pm

WEST END FILM CLUB: The central Century Club in Shaftesbury Avenue turns into a cinema club for one night only, hosting the screening of the film Chef. Your ticket will also provide you with a famous Mojo Pork Cubanos, as featured in the film (they also have the vegetarian option) plus access to the club’s rooftop. £10, prebook, 7.45pm

BRASS BAND: Rich Mix in Shoreditch hosts a brass bands and DJs mashup evening, featuring four acts who were hot on the festival circuit this summer; Temple Funk Collective, Dutty Moonshine, The Brass Funkeys and DJ Chris Tofu. £10/£8, prebook, 8pm

SARA PASCOE: The comedian brings her show, Sara Pascoe vs. History, to Soho Theatre and shares her romantic history, existential theory and cultural insights. Subjects include wars, witches, Kim Jong-il and your ex. £12.50, prebook, 9.30pm

Sunday 23 November

See comedy stars at the Kurdish Comedy Benefit

See comedy stars at the Kurdish Comedy Benefit

SUNDAY ROAST: Nothing says Sunday like a full roast dinner. Have a look at our choice of the best Sunday roasts in London, or check out your other food options.

GUIDED WALKS: Footprints of London has plenty of guided tours to choose from today. We suggest the walk Re-moved, Re-used and Recycled led by guide Andrea Vail around the City, meeting point is Embankment tube station. £10/£7.50, prebook, 11am

CHRISTMAS FAIR: Get into the Christmas spirit at Turner’s House in Twickenham. The Christmas Fair has cards and prints by artists Beverley Waller and Katie Sollohub, scarves by Annie Simpson, Stella Dot jewellery, calendars, a cake stall and much more. All profits go towards Turner’s House Trust’s restoration project. 11am-3pm

OPEN STUDIO: London Centre for Book Arts near Hackney Wick has an open day, with books, prints and gifts available for purchase. They’re also running demonstrations on the printing presses throughout the day. 11am-5pm

FAMILY WORKSHOPJoin artist Raksha Patel at Pumphouse Gallery in Battersea Park, as she teaches you how painting and photography can combine. Alongside the workshop, at 1.30pm there will be a free family tour of the gallery’s current exhibition. Free, 11.30am-3.30pm

MUSIC IN CAMDEN: The Green Note in Camden hosts an afternoon of live music, featuring acts from Jesse Gamage, Rodney Branigan and John Pointer. £5/£7+bf, prebook, from 2pm

WEST END STARS: Cabaret in the House at Lauderdale House gives the public a chance to see West End stars perform in a more intimate setting. Tonight is the turn of Martin Neely, who has performed in  Mary Poppins,  Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, Starlight Express and Les Misérables on the West End stage. £13/£11, prebook, 4.30pm

LIVE MUSIC: Pianist and arranger Dominic Alldis is joined by former Ronnie Scott’s Quintet bassist Andrew Cleyndert and ECM drummer Martin France to perform at Omnibus Clapham. £10, prebook, 7pm

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: University of London Symphony Orchestra plays an evening concert at St Stephen’s Church in Kensington, culminating with Shostakovich’s 5th symphony. £10/£8/£5, prebook, 7.30pm

COMEDY BENEFIT: Comedy stars Jeremy Hardy, Tim Key, Josie Long, Mark Thomas, Andy Zaltzman, Nadia Kamil and Abdul Rashid come together for a charity show at Bloomsbury Theatre, raising money for The Kurdish Red Crescent who are co-ordinating aid for refugees on the Syria/Turkey border. £15/£8, prebook, 7.30pm 

FEMINISM: Wolf Whistled Day of Doing is a day of feminist workshops and discussions for women, including activism, pornography and self defence. There will also be t-shirt printing and zine making. £5/£7, prebook, 11am-5pm


Save on your commute

Here’s a neat way to enjoy the benefits of an Annual Travelcard, but with all the flexibility of monthly payments. CommuterClub offer Londoners a simple loan for their season ticket which is repaid over 11 months. Not only will you save money off your commute, you’ll also delay 2015 fare increases by locking in this year’s prices for another 12 months. Find out more at www.commuterclub.co.uk/londonist

Get an Annual Oystercard with CommuterClub

This weekend’s Things to do is sponsored by CommuterClub.


Other good stuff

Catch up on all latest features, see what we like in theatre and arts and browse more things to do in London.

What have we missed? Let us know what’s going on this weekend, leave a comment or email tips@londonist.com.

For daily ideas of things to do in London subscribe to our emails.

Share

Free And Cheap London Events: 17-23 November 2014

Interesting and unusual things to do for a fiver or less this week. For more ideas have a look at our Free Cheap page.

As part of Parliament Week, Southbank Centre hosts a free music event this week. Details below

As part of Parliament Week, Southbank Centre hosts a free music event this Tuesday. Details below

All Week

ART EXHIBITIONS: Feeling arty this month? There’s plenty to choose from in London. Take a look at our November art listing: this month includes fashion, sleep, art and sex. Most of the exhibitions listed are free.

CHRISTMAS MARKETS: We’re still in November but Christmas markets are starting to spread all over town. To find the closest one to you, check our Christmas markets and fairs listing. Need more ideas? See our November markets and shopping events listing.

SOUTHBANKWorld Press Photo of the Year 2014 is open at Southbank Centre. See 143 selected pictures from over 130 countries that capture news, portrait and sports. Amazingly, this exhibition also costs nowt to get into. Free, until 26 November. For more openings this month, see our November art listing.

EXHIBITION: Mum, Dementia and I is an exhibition at Bernie Grant Art Centre. Annemarie Anang shares her experience of living with a mother who has dementia, through a series of intimate photographs. Free, until 23 November

Monday 17 November

LONDON GOTHIC: London Metropolitan Archives hosts an exhibition about dark stories and horrifying popular tales of London. All materials shown come from the very depths of their archives. Free, until 12 March 2015

IMPERIAL COLLEGE: The People Who Are Keeping Me Alive is a new exhibition organised by Imperial College, starting today at their headquarters in South Kensington. The exhibition focuses on 20-25 individuals from three different hospitals, who are responsible for the care of one cancer patient, Rina Dave. Free, until 30 November

TOILET EXHIBITION: To mark World Toilet Day, My Toilet charity launches a photography exhibition which documents stories of women and girls and their toilets from around the world. The exhibition takes place at the Royal Opera Arcade Gallery and aims to build a visual representation of the day to day reality and the effect this has on their lives, both positive and negative. Free, until 22 November

FAMILY FUN: Join a StoryCraft storytelling session at Rich Mix, aimed at  mums, dads and carers with children aged two to five. Led by a different storyteller or poet each month, all sessions feature a hands-on craft activity. This month the theme is The Magic Carpet, with Rachel Rose Reid. £2 per child, prebook, 1.30pm

STORYTELLING: John Yorke, author of Into the Woods: How Stories Work and Why We Tell Them, is at Hatchard’s on Piccadilly to talk about the nature and structure of stories. £5, prebook, 7.30pm

LOUCHE WOMEN: A live poetry-chat show featuring poetry, singalongalouche, guests and live music. The audience is encouraged to bring A Thing for the chance to win a prize. Co-hosted by Caroline Smith and Sue Kreitzman, at Poetry Cafe. 8pm

Tuesday 18 November

NORMAN CONQUESTSlightly Foxed on Gloucester Road hosts Paul Kingsnorth, who will be giving a talk on the Norman Conquest followed by a reading from The Wake, his award-winning fiction debut. Erica Wagner, former editor of The Times and one of this year’s Man Booker Prize judges, chairs the event. £5, prebook6.30pm

LIBRARY TALK: Head to John Harvard Library in Borough and listen to curator Chris Jordan speak about the original collection of Southwark’s Cuming Museum. Free, just turn up, 6.30pm

ZOOLOGY LECTURE: Grant Museum of Zoology hosts the 18th annual Grant Lecture, with a focus on marsupials and reproductive strategies among vertebrates. The talk is followed by a drinks reception and a private view of the museum. Free, prebook by email, 6.30pm

JOAN OF ARC: Helen Castor explores the facts behind the myth of Joan of Arc — reexamining the story and giving a fresh perspective to an already extraordinary tale, at Waterstones Kensington. £5/£3, prebook, 7pm

CINEMA EVENING: The Ritzy in Brixton hosts Short Sighted Cinema, an evening of screenings that explore the shades and shadows of the human condition. Films are followed by drinks and a QA session with the filmmakers. £3, prebook, 7.30pm

DO DEMOCRACY: As part of Parliament Week, Southbank Centre hosts an evening of live performance and debate. A panel of young musicians and decision makers discuss the relationship between politics and music, followed by a free gig. Free, just turn up, from 7.30pm

PLAY BINGO: The Breakfast Club in Clapham Junction hosts a night of bingo. Plus, it’s Happy Hour all night (which means half price drinks): just need to call your friends now. £5, prebook, 7.30pm

FREE COMEDY: The Tickler Free Comedy Night takes place tonight at The Hemingford Arms in Caledonian Road. Acts appearing are Rhys James, Daryl Perry, Gary From Leeds, Ben Van Der Velde, Twayna Mayne and Ben Clover. Free, just turn up, 8pm

Photo by

Photo by Jamie Hall

Wednesday 19 November

MEN’s DAYCoolTan Arts celebrates International Men’s Day with a whole day of free activities. There will be talks, workshops, a cooking group and even free health checks. Free, email olivia@cooltanarts.org.uk for more information, 12.15pm-6pm 

FREE WALK: Join a free guided walk around Holborn organised by GoToMidtown Walks, with a focus on the Knights Templar. This ancient order set up its first English base in Holborn before moving to the New Temple Church. The walk meeting point is outside Holborn Station, the event repeats on Friday 21 November as well. Free, just turn up, 1pm

TALK DEMOCRACYHow do you imagine democracy in 2115? Sci-fi, fantasy and comic fans, gamers and scientists are invited to join the discussion led by Parliamentary Outreach. The event takes place at the Macmillan Room inside Houses of Parliament. Free, book your place by emailing parliamentaryoutreach@parliament.uk, 6.30pm

BHOPAL DISASTERBhopal: Facing 30 is the culmination of a photographic project that portrays the site of the 1984 Bhopal disaster, in which seven tons of the deadly gas methyl isocyanate leaked, and the people that continue to be affected. A book was produced to commemorate the 30th anniversary and tonight, photographer Francesca Moore and Colin Toogood, campaigns manager for the Bhopal Medical Appeal, are at Housmans Bookshop to discuss it. £3, just turn up, 7pm

DRUNKEN NIGHTSThe George Tavern in Shadwell hosts Drunken Nights III, a mix of live performances including comedy and improvised theatre. Full line-up still to be announced. Free, just turn up, from 8pm

FREE TALK: Listen to Philip Barker who’s at Islington Town Hall taking about the power of language and spoken traditions. He looks at how the linguist’s understanding of the relationship between language and reality often stands in contrast to such approaches to history. Free, just turn up, 8pm

Thursday 20 November

CHARITY EXHIBITION: Stars on Canvas is an art exhibition taking place at The Hub close to Oxford Street. The exhibition features artworks made by famous people in arts and entertainment, which will be sold during an auction from 13-23 November. Artworks start from 99p. Free, until 23 November

LUNCH BREAK: The Royal College of Nursing hosts a free lunchtime lecture considering how we can work to look after ourselves and our loved ones to stay well this winter. Free, prebook by emailing eventsreg@rcn.org.uk, 1pm

GUILDHALL LIBRARY: The historic library hosts Len Taphouse who talks about his apprenticeship as an engineer with Harland Wolff, at North Woolwich, between 1956 and 1961. He tells of the characters in the docks and some of the associated stories about them. Free, prebook2pm

LOVE PHOTOGRAPHY: The Old Truman Brewery teams up with Canon UK for a two-day-long photography event called Capture the Night. Head to Ely’s Yard and experience capturing low-light photography in an urban setting plus get the chance to win a photography workshop with professional photographer Jamie Hall. Free, 20 and 21 November, 4pm-10pm daily 

BOOK LAUNCHRED Gallery in Shoreditch hosts a book launch and a photo exhibition. The book tells of the growth and the development of the gallery from its very beginning. Free, just turn up, 6pm

CHEAP CONCERT: Brent Youth String Orchestra and Regent Brass perform live tonight at Brent Civic Centre, close to Wembley Park. Repertoire includes Bach, Holst, John Williams and Vivaldi. £5/£3, prebook, 7.30pm

Friday 21 November

EXHIBITIONMark Neville: London/Pittsburgh starts today at Alan Cristea Gallery. The artist presents a photographic documentary of the social communities in London and Pittsburgh. His work aims to explore the role of art in contemporary society. Free, until 24 January 2015

FILM CLUB: Head to the Coin Street Neighbourhood Centre for an evening of cinema. Sarah’s Key will be on screen and popcorn, wine and soft drinks are included in the ticket price. £4, just turn up, 6.30pm

Why not trying Urban Food Fest in Shoreditch this weekend? Details below

Why not trying Urban Food Fest in Shoreditch this weekend? Details below

Saturday 22 November

BOOK SALE: Amnesty International Blackheath and Greenwich has a book sale at Church of the Ascension in Blackheath, with thousands of good quality fiction and non-fiction books available. 10am-4pm

FOOD FEST:Urban Food Fest at Euro Car Parks in Shoreditch is a street food night market that takes place every Saturday. There’s a different festive street food menu every week, with dishes including: English roast chicken and cranberry pie, Italian turkey and burrata wood-fired pizza, Venezuelan feta and sage stuffing arepas and American three-bird brioche. Free entry, just turn up, from 5pm

WINTER FAIR: Stroud Green WI’s Winter Fair takes place at Stapleton Tavern on Crouch Hill. It features the work of local talented artists and craft experts, with homemade produce to tempt Christmas shoppers. And it’s in aid of local charity Open Door so you can shop guilt free, knowing you’re making a difference. 12pm-4pm

CITY TOUR: Occupy London Tours is a free alternative tour company, run by volunteers, who want to throw open the secretive world of finance and politics for all to see. Today they tell the story of the UK’s smallest city, the City of London, the history of money in the heart of London and the Square Mile’s role in the financial crisis of 2007/8. Find out just what the Corporation of London actually is and more. Free, prebook2pm

Sunday 23 November

CHRISTMAS FAIR: Get into the Christmas spirit at Turner’s House in Twickenham. The Christmas Fair has cards and prints by artists Beverley Waller and Katie Sollohub, scarves by Annie Simpson, Stella Dot jewellery, calendars and other gifts, a cake stall and much more. All profits go towards Turner’s House Trust’s restoration project. 11am-3pm

OPEN STUDIO: London Centre for Book Arts near Hackney Wick has an open day, and will have books, prints and gifts available for purchase and will be running demonstrations on the printing presses throughout the day. 11am-5pm 

FAMILY WORKSHOP: Join artist Raksha Patel at Pumphouse Gallery in Battersea Park, as she teaches you how painting and photography combine. Alongside the workshop, at 1.30pm there will be a free family tour of the gallery’s current exhibition. Free, 11.30am-3.30pm

Check out our map of free things to do in London for more frugal fun. Or pop over to BrokeInLondon.com who also have plenty of great ideas.

Share

World’s most complete stegosaurus unveiled by Natural History Museum

It was discovered in Wyoming 11 years ago, but was only recently sold at
auction. Most dinosaurs cannot be removed from their country of origin but
the stegosaurus was allowed to leave the US because it was found on private
land.

Professor Paul Barrett, lead dinosaur researcher at the museum, was glancing
through an auction programme of sharks teeth and ammonites, when he
discovered the listed dinosaur. He immediately set about raising funding for
the specimen.

It finally arrived at the museum last December and Prof Barrett has spent the
last 12 months studying the astonishing animal and piecing it back together.

“It’s a bit like Meccano on a giant scale,” he said. “All the pieces have to
fit together in a way that would have allowed the animal to move.

“Stegosaurus is not the most dynamic of animal, so we have gone for an alert
pose. It’s looking at something intently. It might have just spotted a
predator. Some people think they could rear up but its unlikely.

“Fossils of stegosaurus are really rare. In the ground most look like
road-kill and the other examples in museums are mostly constructed from
other materials. There isn’t much left of the original animal. So to get
hold of one in this condition is pretty extraordinary.”


(National History Museum)

The name ‘Stegosaurus’ comes from the Greek words ‘stegos’ meaning roof and
‘sauros’ meaning lizard.

Stegosaurus fossils have been found in western North America and more recently
in Portugal, indicating that they lived in Europe as well.

It would have lived in the late Jurassic period, around 150 million years ago.
By the time Tyrannosaurus Rex evolved in the late Cretaceous period, around
68 million years ago, the creature would have already been a fossil. In fact
there is less distance in time between T-Rex and humans than there is
between the carnivore and stegosaurus.

It would have been entirely herbivorous. Its teeth are tiny, so it could only
have chewed on soft vegetation. Like a cow, it would have needed to eat for
most of the day to fuel its huge body on plants alone. And it would have
shuffled along, reaching a maximum speed of just 5mph.

It has a total of 19 plates on the back and four spikes on the tail, the most
complete set discovered.

All of the individual skull bones are three dimensional and detached from each
other, making it one of the most scientifically valuable dinosaur skulls
ever found. This means scientists can study the skull as never before, by
closely examining individual fossil bones to determine eating habits and
bite strength.

The sex is not known, but the animal was a young adult when it died. It was
discovered in spring 2003 at the Red Canyon Ranch in Wyoming, USA by Bob
Simon, who runs a dinosaur quarry on the ranch.

Mr Simon found the nearly fully connected skeleton buried at the top of a hill
while digging a drainage ditch. It took three weeks of excavation to bring
the remarkable discovery to light.

Since its arrival at the Museum in December 2013, from private facilities in
Switzerland and the USA, scientists have been taking measurements,
photographs, laser surface scans and CT scans of the skeleton to find out
more about the unusual lives of stegosaurs. This data will underpin a series
of scientific studies.

Early scans have shown that the tail spikes were tough enough to penetrate the
skin of predators.

“Having the world’s most complete example here for research means we can begin
to uncover the secrets behind the evolution and behaviour of this intriguing
dinosaur species,” added Prof Barrett.

The stegosaurus, which is due to take pride of place inside the Museum’s
Exhibition Road entrance from 4 December 2014, will be the only one on
public display outside of the US.

It joins the Museum’s collection of 80 million specimens, of which eight
million are fossils. Most of the funding for the dinosaur came from hedge
fund boss Jeremy Herrmann, owner of Ferox.

“We are extremely grateful to the 70 generous donors, with particular thanks
to Jeremy Herrmann, who made this iconic acquisition possible,’ said Sir
Michael Dixon, Director of the Natural History Museum.

The specimen has been named in honour of Jeremy’s daughter Sophie Herrmann.

“It inspires genuine wonder when you see it, but unlike our much-loved
Diplodocus cast, this is the real thing. We hope that this amazing specimen
will inspire a new generation of young visitors to learn more about the
natural world and our place within it,” he added.

Share