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A History of the First World War in 100 moments: The first execution at the …

At 7am the next day, the British Army delivered its response. On a foggy morning, Lody, 37, was led from cell 29 in the Tower of London, placed on a seat at the end of a long wooden shed that served as a rifle range and executed by a firing squad, as a nervous chaplain, his hands shaking, read from a book of prayer.

With this volley, followed by a coup de grace administered from the pistol of the officer in charge, Senior Lieutenant Lody of the Imperial German Naval Reserve became the first person to be executed in the Tower for 167 years. He was also the first of 11 German spies shot dead there during the First World War.

The delivery of the ultimate sanction to an enemy agent on home territory while the carnage of the Western Front was only beginning in earnest fuelled the febrile atmosphere gripping Britain in the early stages of the war.

Novels such as The Invasion of 1910 by spy pulp fiction writer William Le Queux, a fictional account of the German annexation of Britain serialised by the Daily Mail, had stoked fears that Britain would be overrun with legions of crack Teutonic operatives on the outbreak of war.

The reality, as the bold but inept efforts of Lody proved, was less threatening.

A pre-war visit to London in 1911 by Kaiser Wilhelm II had provided a boon to a nascent MI5 when the head of German naval intelligence, who was part of the delegation, was followed to a hairdressing salon near Pentonville prison. The address turned out to belong to the man charged with running Germany’s entire UK espionage ring, and its members were rounded up earlier in 1914, forcing Berlin to dispatch new and largely untrained agents such as Lody to Britain with the outbreak of war.

Born into a military family but thwarted by illness in his own ambitions to become a naval captain, Lody arrived in Edinburgh in August 1914 via Norway with instructions to monitor the Firth of Forth, a crucial anchorage for dozens of Royal Navy ships.

Using a rudimentary code, he sent back letters to his contact in Stockholm, offering information gleaned from rides on his hired bicycle about the configuration of British forces.

One of his messages, indicating that four ships were in dock for repairs, may have played a role in the arrival off Scotland in September 1914 of a U-boat which sank HMS Pathfinder – the first ship destroyed by a submarine-launched torpedo.

But unbeknown to Lody, who spoke perfect English with an American accent after living in Nebraska before the war and was posing as a tourist named Charles Inglis, MI5 already knew that the address he was using in Stockholm was used by German intelligence. His letters were seized by the mail interception service, staffed by 4,000 people, which was set up by MI5 at the outbreak of war.

Lody, who operated from an Edinburgh guest house, became sloppy, often writing letters in German. Some of his more fanciful missives, including one that reported the landing of “large numbers of Russian troops” in Scotland, were let through as misinformation.

He was eventually captured in October 1914 in Ireland, where he had fled after correctly becoming concerned that his cover was blown. The discovery of a tailor’s ticket bearing his real name and a Berlin address helped to confirm his true identity.

But while he may have been no master of deception, it was Lody’s conduct in the face of death that came to define him. Despite ministrations from MI5 that his case be heard in private so he could be potentially turned as a double agent, he was tried in public at the behest of a government keen to highlight its success in rooting out German moles.

With a formality bordering on courtliness, Lody admitted to spying, knowing the punishment for “war treason” was death, but declined to name his controller, saying: “That name I cannot say as I have given my word of honour.”

His gentlemanly declarations of patriotism during his trial, which was widely reported, won him admiration in Britain and Germany. Sir Vernon Kell, the founding head of MI5, told his wife he considered Lody a “really fine man” and “felt it deeply that so brave a man should have to pay the death penalty”.

Shortly after being told he was to be shot the following day, Lody wrote two letters – one of thanks to his captors and one to his family in Stuttgart in which he said: “A hero’s death on the battlefield is certainly finer, but such is not to be my lot, and I die here in the enemy’s country silent and unknown… I have had just judges and I shall die as an officer, not as a spy.”

As he was escorted to his death by eight Guardsmen, a witness noted the condemned man was the “calmest and most composed” member of the execution party. When the chaplain reading the words of the Burial Service as he led the way to the rifle range made a wrong turn, Lody stepped forward and politely caught the cleric by his arm, guiding him in the right direction.

Lody said to the military police officer in charge of the party: “I suppose you will not shake hands with a German spy?”

“No,” the officer replied, “but I will shake hands with a brave man.”

Tuesday: The great postal mobilisation

‘A History of the Great War in 100 Moments’ appears daily, in The Independent and in The Independent on Sunday. Earlier ‘moments’ in the series can be seen at independent.co.uk/greatwar

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Wheels of fortune: how the Southbank underestimated London’s skateboard …

To fund the new buildings the Southbank Centre would have to build shops and restaurants in the undercroft beneath the Royal Festival Hall, which for 40 years has been used by skaters. They are determined not to give up their space, refusing an alternative site near Hungerford Bridge that the Southbank Centre offered to build. In February the centre had to withdraw its plans because it hadn’t received planning permission or sufficient funding and, crucially, support from the Mayor of London. Next month it is due to announce whether it has managed to find alternative funds.

Meanwhile, the skaters’ crusade to save the undercroft has attracted support from Thom Yorke, Russell Brand and even Arlene Phillips. The official bid to fill the space drew 40,000 individual objections, making it the most unpopular planning application in UK history, and Boris Johnson added his support, saying the redevelopment should not be “at the detriment of the skate park”. Skaters said they were “stoked” to have him onside.

So how did a bunch of boys on boards manage to galvanise such widespread support? Paul Richards, who does not have a background in skating but has been involved with the Long Live South Bank (LLSB) campaign to save the undercroft for a year through community organisation Brazenbunch, says: “It’s an organic movement that completely opposes hierarchy. A lot of people could learn from the way the campaign has been organised. Creativity, sheer dedication, commitment and passion are what have made it successful.”



Alice DellalSupporter: Alice Dellal (Picture: Dave Benett/Getty)




Russell BrandRussell Brand (Picture: Dave Hogan/Getty)

Every day at this brightly graffitied space by the river, LLSB campaigners take it in turns to man a stall selling merchandise branded with the LLSB logo and encourage passers-by to sign a petition that so far has more than 70,000 signatures. This stall is the first indication that, despite the relaxed image of skaters, LLSB is a highly organised, well-funded operation — one that lobby groups should look to for a lesson in how slick campaigning can lead to triumph for the underdogs. It is said to have drawn financial support from a wide swathe of people — from tourists to City bankers.

The campaign began with a group of loyal skaters, including film-maker Henry Edwards-Wood from Kingston, who became a spokesperson for the group, and made a film, The Bigger Picture, to support it. Also campaigning have been Lev Tanju, founder of Palace Skateboards, and Gavin Skew of Slam City Skates — both giants of the skating world who have collaborated with Selfridges, Vice magazine and Dazed and Confused as well as hosting events attended by Alice Dellal and Pixie Geldof.

Meanwhile, the distinctive LLSB campaign logo was designed by Arran Gregory, an illustrator who has worked with Ralph Lauren, Coca-Cola and Levi’s. This branding has been so popular that T-shirts emblazoned with the logo are worn all over the world. 

But a logo and media presence can only carry a campaign so far. A priority was making sure the case for keeping the undercroft was as watertight as possible. Early on, LLSB hired lawyer Simon Ricketts. A partner at King and Wood Mallesons SJ Berwin, Ricketts has been named the most highly rated planning lawyer in the country by Planning Magazine for four years running. When he’s not trying to save the undercroft, Ricketts acts for objectors to the HS2 rail link.

His approach to the case has two strands. He says: “It’s an interesting case in political and legal terms, and the intangible importance of some found spaces. The first approach is an application for “village green status”, which has implications for the future of village greens across the country, and there’s also a community value aspect. We are waiting for the results.”

As well as legally representing LLSB, Ricketts has been supportive in the media, writing a letter to this paper that said Boris Johnson’s support was “a step in the right direction”.



Munira MirzaMunira Mirza, London’s deputy mayor for culture (Picture: Matt Writtle)

 

Ricketts wouldn’t say how much LLSB is paying him, only that he is working on a fee basis, but as the most senior person in his company’s planning department his usual rates are £575 an hour.

Paul Richards says LLSB is proud that “there has been no corporate or company financial donation to the campaign and it is solely based on donations from the public and money generated from the merchandise the campaign has created”.

A source close to the skating community thinks that some of these donations have come from parents of the skaters. He mentions the father of Tom “Blondey” McCoy, a 16-year-old skater from south London, who is thought to be in finance, and says he has heard that he “bankrolled the campaign”. Blondey McCoy did not respond to requests for comment but Richards strongly denies that this is the case and says he “can’t divulge personal matters in relation to donors even if I had that information, which I don’t.”

Blondey, who models for Palace skateboards, has also acted as a poster boy for the campaign. Vogue photographer Alasdair McLellan shot him for a piece in i-D magazine, which says the plans should “outrage” everyone. “If the plans go ahead in one fell swoop the communities and the creativity established over 40 years will be killed: by an arts centre of all things.”

Ricketts speaks highly of the campaigners, saying: “The case has been easy to make because we are purely articulating reality. The people involved have been able to express themselves in public meetings and the media in a direct, engaging, truthful way, which has resonated with all sections of the community.”

A source close to the group says that in November there was a conscious decision to broaden their appeal beyond skating, in order to gain support from a larger section of the community.

He says: “Since LLSB began, the space has become an urban circus, with spoken word, graffiti, BMX and parkour. That’s one way they have attracted so much support.”

As a skater, Edwards-Wood is said not have been completely convinced by this approach but it proved effective. London’s deputy mayor for culture and education Munira Mirza outlines the view of Boris Johnson thus: “The Mayor has always said he supports the principle of enhancing the world class facilities of the Southbank Centre but not at the detriment of the skate park which should be retained in its current position. The undercroft is widely recognised as the home of British skateboarding and has developed organically over the last 40 years as a much loved public space … It simply can’t be moved and recreated elsewhere.”

The skate community is also a huge asset. A source says: “The irony of skateboarding is that it is a billion-pound industry. From a marketing perspective, all the Palace Skate riders pay homage to the South Bank so if it was to disappear, Palace would not have the grip in location that it does for branding.”

Lev Tanju, founder of Palace, says: “I help as much as I can but we would never want to push the Palace brand forward by using something as important as Southbank. And the people who ride for us, like Blondey, help the campaign because they love the undercroft and for no other reason.”

The battle is not yet won, and the development is too important to the Southbank Centre for it to give up. The Centre’s chairman Rick Haythornthwaite has said this stall for the scheme is “a big setback”.

The centre says its buildings “are in desperate need of repair” and the new site “would provide free art and culture for two million people each year, including educational opportunities for 150,000 young people, while creating nearly 700 new jobs.”

LLSB eagerly awaits the outcome of its cases and how the Southbank Centre is going to reconsider funding applications. But for now, thanks to this feat of campaigning, it is LLSB that has the upper hand. This juncture where marketing, merchandise, powerful connections and affection for a London space meet has proved to be a force the Southbank Centre did not expect to have to reckon with.

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Hull reaches 1st FA Cup final in 110-year history

— Hull reached the FA Cup final for the first time in its 110-year history as the Premier League side twice came from behind to beat third-tier club Sheffield United 5-3 in a lively encounter on Sunday.

After winning world football’s oldest cup competition three times as a Manchester United player in the 1990s, Hull manager Steve Bruce will bring his team back to Wembley Stadium on May 17 for the final against 10-time winner Arsenal.

“If you had said 10 years ago that Hull will play Arsenal in the FA Cup final, people would have been scratching their heads,” Bruce said. “It just shows you what can be done.”

Hull is now just one game away from emulating Wigan’s surprising run to the title last year. But the team will need to improve vastly on its first-half performance in order to win the club’s first major trophy after United — which won the last of its four FA Cups in 1925 and last played in the Premier League in the 2007 — twice led at the national stadium.

But Hull was transformed after halftime, with Matty Fryatt restoring parity at 2-2 before Tom Huddlestone and Stephen Quinn gave the northeast team what appeared to be a comfortable cushion. Even though Jamie Murphy pulled a late goal back for United, David Meyler quickly responded to secure Hull’s first trip to a major final.

“We were very sloppy in the first half and didn’t get going,” Meyler said. “We got together at halftime and regrouped. It’s fantastic.”

One dilemma for Bruce in the final will be whether to play son Alex Bruce, who remained on the bench throughout the semifinal. At the 1991 final, Nigel Clough played up front in father Brian’s Nottingham Forest team, which lost to Tottenham. Nigel Clough was back at Wembley managing Sheffield United on Sunday for an emotional occasion as English football marks the 25-year anniversary of the Hillsborough disaster.

Clough was in the Forest team on April 15, 1989, for the FA Cup semifinal at Sheffield Wednesday’s ground that became the scene of Britain’s worst sporting disaster as 96 Liverpool fans were crushed to death.

“With the tributes it’s been a very, very emotional weekend for everybody in football,” Clough said. “Twenty-five years on the feelings are the same.”

The Hillsborough game lasted just six minutes before the full magnitude of the deadly crush became clear. On this weekend of tributes to the victims, and education for a new generation of fans, every game kicked off seven minutes later than usual.

Fittingly, United’s opening goal came from Jose Baxter, a boyhood Liverpool fan who went on to play for Everton. After bundling the ball in from close range, the 22-year-old Baxter removed his black armband and held it up while looking up to the sky.

Baxter’s side was in the ascendancy for much of the first half, making Hull look ordinary, until Sagbo slid in to equalize in the 42nd. But United’s lead was restored inside 100 seconds as Stefan Scougall completed a speedy break.

The game swung in Hull’s favor, however, within 10 minutes of the second half as Fryatt forced the ball over the line from close range after United failed to fully clear a corner, and Huddlestone weaved his way through the defense before cooling chipping into the net.

Then came what proved to Hull’s match-winner, with Quinn heading in against his former club in the 67th. Even though Murphy gave United hope of a dramatic comeback by slicing in his team’s third in the 90th, Meyler’s goal settled the match.

If Hull does manage to etch its name onto the FA Cup, it won’t be the one Hull owner Assem Allam wants to see. The Egyptian businessman was rebuffed by the FA earlier this week in his attempt to change Hull City to Hull Tigers, a name he believes would help the team earn more international fans and exposure.

Winning the Cup — and qualifying for the Europa League — could have the same effect.

Rob Harris can be followed at www.twitter.com/RobHarris

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Kenyans throng joints to watch London race

By ERICK OCHIENG’

EAEP Sales Manager David Rono

Kenyans thronged various entertainment joints to watch the proceedings of the 2014 London Marathon yesterday.

In Nairobi, the action was at the Mercury Lounge, Nakumatt Junction, where sports journalists congregated to watch the Kenyan aces win in London.

A book by Kevin Lillis – Running for Black Gold – published by East African Educational Publishers was launched during the occasion presided over by the publishing firm’s Sales Manager David Rono.

There was also a quiz session for the media which was won by the Media Combined team, that retained the title at the fifth edition of the London Marathon Viewing and Quiz competition.

The Media Combined team comprising Captain Erick Ochieng’ (The Standard), Kenneth Wepukhulu (Mediamax), Erick Ludeya (Sunday Express), Samson Ateka (The Star) and Dennis Muritu (Freelance) edged the Nation/The Star team led by Ayumba Ayodi and Muigai Kiguru by 27 points to the latter’s 26.

The winners were awarded with Dstv Walka Handheld television sets while the runners up took home copies of Running for Black Gold.

The event organised by Tin Sky Media was sponsored by SuperSport, East African Educational Publishers and Kenya Orient Insurance.

The quiz was divided into four sections including history of Kenyan athletics, history of London Marathon, sponsors trivia and the 2014 London Marathon.

“We hold this event to bring Kenyans and the media together to celebrate the achievements of our athletes,” said Tim Sky Director Tim Kamuzu Banda. —eoyugi@standardmedia.co.ke

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Hull reaches 1st FA Cup final in 110-year history – Columbus Ledger

— Hull reached the FA Cup final for the first time in its 110-year history as the Premier League side twice came from behind to beat third-tier club Sheffield United 5-3 in a lively encounter on Sunday.

After winning world football’s oldest cup competition three times as a Manchester United player in the 1990s, Hull manager Steve Bruce will bring his team back to Wembley Stadium on May 17 for the final against 10-time winner Arsenal.

“If you had said 10 years ago that Hull will play Arsenal in the FA Cup final, people would have been scratching their heads,” Bruce said. “It just shows you what can be done.”

Hull is now just one game away from emulating Wigan’s surprising run to the title last year. But the team will need to improve vastly on its first-half performance in order to win the club’s first major trophy after United — which won the last of its four FA Cups in 1925 and last played in the Premier League in the 2007 — twice led at the national stadium.

But Hull was transformed after halftime, with Matty Fryatt restoring parity at 2-2 before Tom Huddlestone and Stephen Quinn gave the northeast team what appeared to be a comfortable cushion. Even though Jamie Murphy pulled a late goal back for United, David Meyler quickly responded to secure Hull’s first trip to a major final.

“We were very sloppy in the first half and didn’t get going,” Meyler said. “We got together at halftime and regrouped. It’s fantastic.”

One dilemma for Bruce in the final will be whether to play son Alex Bruce, who remained on the bench throughout the semifinal. At the 1991 final, Nigel Clough played up front in father Brian’s Nottingham Forest team, which lost to Tottenham. Nigel Clough was back at Wembley managing Sheffield United on Sunday for an emotional occasion as English football marks the 25-year anniversary of the Hillsborough disaster.

Clough was in the Forest team on April 15, 1989, for the FA Cup semifinal at Sheffield Wednesday’s ground that became the scene of Britain’s worst sporting disaster as 96 Liverpool fans were crushed to death.

“With the tributes it’s been a very, very emotional weekend for everybody in football,” Clough said. “Twenty-five years on the feelings are the same.”

The Hillsborough game lasted just six minutes before the full magnitude of the deadly crush became clear. On this weekend of tributes to the victims, and education for a new generation of fans, every game kicked off seven minutes later than usual.

Fittingly, United’s opening goal came from Jose Baxter, a boyhood Liverpool fan who went on to play for Everton. After bundling the ball in from close range, the 22-year-old Baxter removed his black armband and held it up while looking up to the sky.

Baxter’s side was in the ascendancy for much of the first half, making Hull look ordinary, until Sagbo slid in to equalize in the 42nd. But United’s lead was restored inside 100 seconds as Stefan Scougall completed a speedy break.

The game swung in Hull’s favor, however, within 10 minutes of the second half as Fryatt forced the ball over the line from close range after United failed to fully clear a corner, and Huddlestone weaved his way through the defense before cooling chipping into the net.

Then came what proved to Hull’s match-winner, with Quinn heading in against his former club in the 67th. Even though Murphy gave United hope of a dramatic comeback by slicing in his team’s third in the 90th, Meyler’s goal settled the match.

If Hull does manage to etch its name onto the FA Cup, it won’t be the one Hull owner Assem Allam wants to see. The Egyptian businessman was rebuffed by the FA earlier this week in his attempt to change Hull City to Hull Tigers, a name he believes would help the team earn more international fans and exposure.

Winning the Cup — and qualifying for the Europa League — could have the same effect.

Rob Harris can be followed at www.twitter.com/RobHarris

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London Marathon: Mo Farah Beaten By Kipsang

Kenyan Wilson Kipsang has beaten Britain’s Mo Farah to win the London Marathon, breaking the course record for the race.

Double Olympic gold medallist Farah finished in eighth place with a time of 2hrs 08mins 20secs, narrowly missing out on the British record he had targeted.

Kipsang crossed the finish line in 2hrs 04mins 27secs, beating the previous best time for the event by 13 seconds.

Farah admitted the race had been “tough” but defended his decision to switch from the track to the road and make his 26.2 mile debut in his home town.

He said: “London, this is my city, it would have been wrong to do any other marathon.”

Edna Kiplagat won the women’s race in a time of 2hrs 20mins 21secs.

The elite runners started ahead of 36,000 competitors tackling the course on a warm and sunny day in the capital.

Famous faces taking part include former Liverpool and England striker Michael Owen, Game of Thrones actress Natalie Dormer, and Michelin-star chef Michel Roux Jr.

The amateur field includes Katie and Polly Ryall who are aiming to set a new world record for a pair of sisters combined by beating the current 5hrs 09mins 21secs benchmark while running for the charity Sense.

British Paralympian David Weir failed in his bid to become the best wheelchair racer in the event’s history as he finished second behind Switzerland’s Marcel Hug.

The races started at Blackheath and Greenwich Park ended on The Mall.

Many roads in central London have been closed and some delays are expected on public transport.

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Hull reaches 1st FA Cup final in 110-year history

— Hull reached the FA Cup final for the first time in its 110-year history as the Premier League side twice came from behind to beat third-tier club Sheffield United 5-3 in a lively encounter on Sunday.

Hull manager Steve Bruce, who won world football’s oldest cup competition three times as a Manchester United player in the 1990s, will return to Wembley Stadium for the final on May 17 against Arsenal.

His team will need to improve vastly on its first-half performance in order to win the club’s first major trophy, though, as United — which won the last of its four FA Cups in 1925 and last played in the Premier League in the 2007 — twice led at the national stadium.

But Hull was transformed after halftime, with Matty Fryatt restoring parity at 2-2 before Tom Huddlestone and Stephen Quinn gave the northeast team what appeared to be a comfortable cushion. Even though Jamie Murphy pulled a late goal back for United, David Meyler quickly responded to secure Hull’s first trip to a major final.

“We were very sloppy in the first half and didn’t get going,” Meyler said. “We got together at halftime and regrouped. It’s fantastic.”

One dilemma for Bruce in the final will be whether to play son Alex Bruce, who remained on the bench throughout the semifinal. At the 1991 final, Nigel Clough played up front in father Brian’s Nottingham Forest team, which lost to Tottenham. Nigel Clough was back at Wembley managing Sheffield United on Sunday for an emotional occasion as English football marks the 25-year anniversary of the Hillsborough disaster.

Clough was in the Forest team on April 15, 1989, for the FA Cup semifinal at Sheffield Wednesday’s ground that became the scene of Britain’s worst sporting disaster as 96 Liverpool fans were crushed to death.

“With the tributes it’s been a very, very emotional weekend for everybody in football,” Clough said. “Twenty-five years on the feelings are the same.”

The Hillsborough game lasted just six minutes before the full magnitude of the deadly crush became clear. On this weekend of tributes to the victims, and education for a new generation of fans, every game kicked off seven minutes later than usual.

Fittingly, United’s opening goal came from Jose Baxter, a boyhood Liverpool fan who went on to play for Everton. After bundling the ball in from close range from John Brayford’s cross, the 22-year-old Baxter removed his black armband and held it up while looking up to the sky.

Baxter’s side was in the ascendancy for much of the first half, making Hull look ordinary, until Sagbo slid in to equalize in the 42nd. But United’s lead was restored inside 100 seconds as Stefan Scougall completed a speedy break.

The game swung in Hull’s favor, however, within 10 minutes of the second half as Fryatt forced the ball over the line from close range after United failed to fully clear a corner, and Huddlestone weaved his way through the defense before cooling chipping into the net.

Then came what proved to Hull’s match-winner, with Quinn heading in against his former club in the 67th. Even though Murphy gave United hope of a dramatic comeback by slicing in his team’s third in the 90th, Meyler’s goal ensured there would be no extra time.

Just like with last year’s success by Wigan, Hull next month could ensure a new name is etched onto the FA Cup.

“All the pressure is on Arsenal,” Bruce said. “They haven’t won anything for (nine) years. So it’ll be a great occasion.”

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Perfectly Preserved Woolly Mammoth on Display at London’s Natural History …

Lyuba, whose carcass is 40,000 years old, was found by a reindeer herder in Yamal Peninsula in Russia in 2007

This 42,000-year-old woolly mammoth, nicknamed Lyuba, is so well preserved that there were traces of her mother’s milk in her stomach and some eyelashes remain intact.

Lyuba was one month old when she died, and it’s believed that she drowned in mud. She was found on the Yamal Peninsula, Russia, in 2007 on the banks of a frozen river.

Victoria Herridge, a paleobiologist specialising in elephants at the Natural History Museum in London, told the Sunday Times: “When they did the autopsy on her she is so complete that we could get a look at her insides and see her last meal.

“She had milk from suckling her mother and also remnants of faecal matter in her gut, which suggest she had been eating her mother’s dung. This is something living elephants do as the dung provides the infants with microbes to help them ingest their food.”

A child points to the carcass of the world's most well-preserved baby mammoth, displayed in a Hong Kong shopping mall

Scientists could also piece together the final moments of her life. “They found that her lungs had collapsed and her trunk was full of sediment. This points to the poor baby mammoth getting mired in this salty marshy bog and slowly drowning in the mud.”

Recreating mammoths through cloning is a long-held scientists’ dream and has been the subject of Hollywood films such as Jurassic Park. However, Herridge thinks in the case of Lyuba, it’s highly unlikely.

“I’m sure people are trying but even though Lyuba has been preserved beautifully, her DNA will have deteriorated and there are still too many gaps,” she said.

Lyube will go on display at London’s Natural History Museum from 23 May until 7 September 2014, as part of an exhibition entitled Mammoths: Ice Age Giants. Other items on display include the spiral-tusked Columbian mammoth and their island-dwelling relative, the dwarf mammoth. There will also be other prehistoric giants such as the mastodon, the fearsome sabre-tooth cat and the giant short-faced bear.

The museum’s mammoth expert, Professor Adrian Lister, said of Lyuba: “This exhibition is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to meet this amazing creature. She is hugely important for helping us to understand the lives of ice age animals.”

Watch a video explaining more about woolly mammoths

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